Praise from the top for Spanish cuisine

LAST UPDATED: 10 Nov, 2012 @ 16:38
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Praise from the top for Spanish cuisine

THE head chef at the best restaurant in the world has revealed how his experiences of Spanish cuisine persuaded him to dedicate his life to food.

Rene Redzepi, owner of the two-Michelin-starred NOMA in Copenhagen, explained how a memorable meal at Arzak restaurant in San Sebastian had proved to be a defining moment.

Speaking at a food conference in the Basque city, the 34-year-old former elBulli trainee said: “My first big experience with food was eating at Arzak when I was 15.

“I had saved for a whole year to be able to afford to eat there. It was after having dinner there that I decided to dedicate myself to food.

Redzepi, whose restaurant has been voted the world’s best for each of the last three years, added: “This city is a world leader for food.

“Many of the world’s most prestigious chefs learned their trade in San Sebastian and there is no significant cook today who has not visited the city in the past.”

9 COMMENTS

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  1. Spanish cuisine,no,Euskadi cuisine.

    This article has nothing whatever to do with typical cuisine from any part of Spain, which is as we all know is about ‘meat and chips’.It is about trendy, outrageously priced nouveau cuisine.

    Best restaurant in the world – how can you possibly compare say Japanese/Thai/Sri-Lankan/American fusion cooking – all wonderful in their own way and completely different. Compare like with like to have any rational meaning.

  2. @Stuart All about ‘meat and chips’? Were you really in Spain? I’m thinking of the more famous Spanish dishes – fabada Asturiana, paella, gazpacho, pulpo a la gallega, pisto, pote gallego, potatas bravas etc and in no case can they even approximate to a description “meat and chips”.. Ok, on some menus they may have a 2nd dish as fish or steak that also gets served with chips, but it’s hardly seen as authentic Spanish fare, just like Spaghetti (or even curry) that can also be found on menus now. Even the more famous Spanish meat based dishes – albondigas, chorizo, morcilla – are items I’ve never seen served with chips. Criticise it for being too hearty, for lacking subtle spices or sauces, if you must. “Meat and chips” – Sorry, not a Spain I recognise – may be different in a resort I suppose..

  3. Potatas bravas – a horrible greasy version of bubble and squeak.

    You mention lots of dishes that are made at home but rarely seen in restaurants. When Granada Hoy was launched it had great giveaways and one of them was traditional Granadino recipes – all of which originated in north Africa and all, of which can be found in any good Morroccan or Algerian restaurant.

    I have never seen a single one of those recipes available at any restaurant in Granada province or anywhere else.

    I lived in Galicia, have you English Dragon – can you speak gallego? I lived in a small apartment block where the mother of the extended family downstairs was known as the La cocinera de la Magdalena – the best cook in Ortigueria, where she taught me all the classic Galician dishes.

    As to your stupid comment about resorts – I first visited Spain in 1968 when indeed Spain had truly different regional dishes and in 2003 we travelled through parts of Spain that I knew from 68 – what an ugly shambles and what terrible food we had to eat.

    If you had bothered to read any of my comments on this forum you would know that we have never lived in those awful Brit ghetto/resorts.

    You mention many dishes – can you cook any of these dishes, indeed can you even boil an egg – those who can do and those that can’t vorate garbage.

    BTW – you failed to mention Gazpacho Manchego, available just over the border from Andaluz – how many regions of Spain have you travelled through – not lived in Spain – tonto.

  4. Stuart Crawford – “You mention lots of dishes that are made at home but rarely seen in restaurants.”

    Actually everything EnglishDragon mentioned are dishes that I see in almost every single restaurant I eat at daily (I always eat out, never cook) – unless for some reason I’m driving through an expat tourist resort or I actively seek out international cuisine.

    …then it’s chips.

  5. English Dragon,
    where did you eat all those Gallego and Asturian dishes, in Galicia and Asturias. I need to know before replying further.

    I’d like to know at what restaurants and in which towns or cities you ate these regional dishes – then I’ll reply to your typically snide English remark.

    Jim – if potatas bravas is your idea of good food you must have eaten garbage back in the UK.

    The troll can’t cook – what a mummy’s boy – well that’s no surprise.

  6. @Reality “Actually everything EnglishDragon mentioned are dishes that I see in almost every single restaurant I eat at daily” Thank you. Dishes such as Fabada or Pote Gallego are very common on the Menu del dia in Spanish cities, particularly in the winter season. Funnily enough I’ve never been quite as far as Galicia but have sampled Pulpo a la Gallega in many cities including Valencia, Granada, Madrid and Valladolid. To repeat, I can understand someone trying to criticise Spanish cuisine for lacking too many sauces, or not using many spices, but “meat and chips”??? I really don’t see that in any of the typical Spanish dishes. It’s like describing British (or even French) food as hamburgers and pizza – yes those things can be bought but they are not British dishes.

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