SAVED! Junta places ‘explicit ban’ on Valdevaqueros development

LAST UPDATED: 27 Jul, 2013 @ 21:39
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SAVED! Junta places ‘explicit ban’ on Valdevaqueros development

GREEN groups have reacted with joy after a controversial hotel and villa development was stopped in its tracks by the Junta.

New legislation has been put in place to protect the huge area around Tarifa’s emblematic Valdevaqueros beach.

It comes after the town hall passed the scheme that would have seen a 1,400-room hotel and 350 properties being built next to the beach, which is celebrated for its nature and beauty.

After a huge outcry by environmentalists and demonstrations on the beach attended by 20,000 people, the Junta has revised the legislation that would have permitted construction on the coast.

This new legislation halts a huge 43,533 properties currently under construction or set to begin, as well as refusing permissions for a further 187,000 properties that are within with 500 metres of Andalucia’s coastline.

The provinces greatest affected are Almeria, Huelva and above all, Cadiz, where a total of 16,665 have been blocked.

In particular, the revision of the coastal law includes an explicit ban on building in Valdevaqueros.

The Junta has declared that 74 hectares threatened by the development have now been classified as ‘territorial protection coastal area 1’ – the most restrictive.

This means, it is completely forbidden to ‘build homes or any other type of constructions, buildings or facilities,’ except those directly related to the conservation and maintenance of the environment or educational activities.

Intensive cultivation in plastic greenhouses is also banned for areas that, like Valdevaqueros, have been declared protection zones 1.

This means that the damaging spread of so-called ‘plasticulture’ is being prevented in 67 locations (22 in Almeria, 22 in Cadiz, 17 in Malaga, nine in Granada and nine in Huelva).

Of these new ‘buffer zones’, 17 are classified as needing ‘high protection’ and 47 have lower restrictions, allowing some construction.

The remaining three correspond to the Natural Park of Sierra de Gata-Nijar, where the illegal Algarrobico Hotel has been built.

A spokesman for the Ecologistas en Accion group that has campaigned continually against development on the coast said: “This is excellent news and marks an important change in urban policy at the Junta.”

He added: “The scrapping of Valdevaqueros should be the first step in guaranteeing the safety of all virgin coastline in Andalucia and against the continual politics of brick.”

The new legislation is expected to come into force in March 2014.

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21 COMMENTS

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  1. “The Junta has declared that 74 hectares threatened by the development have now been classified as ‘territorial protection coastal area – the most restrictive.”

    Excellent news!

    The Andalucian Junta passed the law. Now that all is remains is for environmental groups to ensure that is observed. And they are very good at that.

    Christine, you are spot on with your assessment.

    Unfortunately that is not true of the other contributor. but that is what we have come to expect.

  2. One wonders if the halt to construction is down to “legislation” or lack of funding? It makes good copy for the Junta, if nothing else

  3. My grandmother has a saying,”give a good pail of milk then kick it over”. I believe that is what Tony is saying. Instead of simply stating something positive you ruin the sentiment with following up with something that is not.
    I hope everyone gets a chance to go out and enjoy this beautiful space. I intend to go back for sure.

  4. Christine, I’m merely pointing out what I read elsewhere. Don’t shoot the messenger. Spain has a terrible habit of announcing resolutions to these sorts of problems, and then an appeal comes along and overturns it. You seem very naive to this very common Spanish behaviour. Just look in Estepona where they turned a chiringuito into a 5 storey hotel. The OP said it had been “demoilshed” but in fact they just removed two storeys. So whenever I read such stories I take them with a pinch of salt because nothing is ever as it seems here, sadly.

    The OP should investigate what this latest appeal means, and what ramififications it will hav, if granted.

  5. Fred..it is not like you don’t have a history of always pointing out the glass half empty, no make that empty. I would not call it very naive as much as I would choosing not to always be so negative.
    Stefanjo don’t worry you didn’t burst my bubble. I am a firm believer if you choose to be some place you do what you can to make it better no matter how big or small; if you don’t like it move on. I am very lucky to call both Spain and USA home, both have their share of problems (what place on this earth doesn’t) but they are both pretty awesome as well.

  6. Christine, a glass half empty can also be a glass half full. What you perceive to be negative I perceive to be day-to-day experiences of a country I have lived and worked in for many years. Btw, I don’t think “awesome” sums up the experiences of most Spanish in the current climate (not the ones I’ve talked to anyway.) Perhaps you can explain what you mean? Do you mean it is aweseome because you are financially secure and have no worries, as such?

  7. Fred. Stop being a tool. Go find some joy somewhere. Everyone’s right, you always find a negative and then feel the need to spoil everyone’s day.

    Christine. Have a nice walk girl. Hope you find somewhere to have a nice meal too.

  8. Richard and Christine,
    you like so many others choose not to face reality and prefer rose tinted glasses – that’s fine but others choose to see what really is.

    In doing so Fred confronts you with your irrational I’m all right Jack mentality and of course you don’t like that – tough.

    Christine, since the USA is such a corrupt country, being in Spain is the same for you as being at home – re-zoning in the USA simple – just find out who to bung and it’s done.

    Building homes near dangerous industrial locations – no problem – your not from Texas are you.

  9. I wouldn’t get involved Richard and Christine.

    After reading various articles lately, there appears to be a gang of about four people constantly on here that if you find any joy in life, in Spain, want to take that away from you.

  10. The only thing removing joy from peoples lives in this particular case are the Andalucian authorities, who are currently appealing the Coastal Law. To suggest that we must not mention such facts because they might upset someone is, quite incredulous. The politics of brick are very difficult to beat.

  11. This will be my final comment on this because for one, the topic went way off base(as usual) and second there is no reasoning with malcontents( as in the adjective not the noun). I’m sorry those in question feel the need to seek joy in doom and gloom and tearing people down in EVERY SINGLE POST. Of course I realize there are tremendous problems out there but being an arm chair politician won’t solve them. If your going to be about it then be about it. I am active with others in my community trying to up-lift and work to make things better no matter how small it maybe on the local level. Not that I have to explain myself to anyone but I am not a retiree with a pension, I work and also volunteer. Every day I wake up and am able to do something positive… gracia de Dios… is “awesome” in my book.
    In the words of Stuart if you don’t like that tough!
    With that I wish everyone peace.

  12. Thank goodness for people like Mr Stevens and Christine.

    Pound to a pint of pig manure the naysayers have formed a little community association somewhere and spend their lives endlessly looking for something to get all uptight about.

    If being happy and accepting something for what it is, is irrational then coat me with sugar and call me al lollipop.

    I bet the same people condemn immigrants to the UK who refuse to learn the lingo and try to change the culture.

    You’re not on this spinning lump of rock for long enough, don’t waste what little time you have fretting.

  13. Thank you Richard. I’m sure you speak for a lot of readers.

    There seems to be a few psuedo aficionados of all that’s negative on here (Logging on every day to their computers, searching just for someone or something to put down. What a waste of valuable time). As if they hold such importance to speak for everyone whilst feeling they have to force their views down readers throats and putting comments down for the sake of it every time.

    We all know there are problems around us. We’re not daft.

    Please stay as happy as possible in a troubled financial time. That’s what most locals are doing around our way. Simple healthy living al fresco lifestyles.

  14. “I’m sorry those in question feel the need to seek joy in doom and gloom and tearing people down in EVERY SINGLE POST”

    Where? You must be on a different website Christine. Btw, you didn’t tell us why Spain is awesome.

  15. Christine’s pail of milk has well and truly been kicked over. Valdevaqueros saved. Cost = 1x El Palmar. Stefanjo was right in a roundabout way…

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