On your bike! Andalucian government plans new cycle network

LAST UPDATED: 7 Sep, 2013 @ 18:22
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On your bike! Andalucian government plans new cycle network

THE Andalucian government is investing EUR403.8m in a new network of cycle paths across the region and the consolidation of the existing 3080km of cycle tourism paths.

Plan Andaluza de la Bicicleta will create 1064 urban and inter-urban cycle paths in the eight provincial capitals of Andalucia, while the existing tourist routes which currently use cattle trails and rural lanes will be consolidated and updated.

Around three-quarters of the capital invested will come from the regional government’s funds, with the remainder being funded by local councils, either in cash or through the income they generate by charging telephone operators and other services for use of the subsoil.

The project will be on public display until the end of September, and if approved work will begin next year.

9 COMMENTS

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  1. It’s all very good spending all this money on cycle tracks etc for cyclists in a country that is virtually broke. How much do these cyclists contribute to the economy compared with motorists? They pay no road tax, no ITV to check that their machines are roadworthy and don’t even have to carry insurance, so if you are involved in an accident with one and it turns out they are to blame, you get nowhere. Besides which when you come across them on the public roads they usually ride two abreast making it difficult and dangerous to pass them. No, I think it is time for Spain to get it’s priorities right, the 403.8 million euros could be better spent elsewhere.

  2. Let me guess… this isn’t “cofinaciado por la UE” is it? I recon it probably is. So British/German taxpayers will be funding most of it and some friend/relation of the guy in the Junta who is organising this will be awarded the contract. I’m sure the British/German taxpayers are delighted to chip in for this bit of EU “solidarity”…

  3. Well Yogi Bear, is it such a silly comment indeed? Then please enlighten me, what does 403 million mean, in perspective? How much is spend on roads in the region during the same period? How much has been spend on roads in the past without considering alternatives?

    A well designed and safe cycle network enables cheap travel, and is an opportunity for people that cannot afford a car – maybe specially useful in a country in a crisis?

  4. Overgrown Hippie, I agree with your comments about how much is spent on roads in the region, as you imply, much more than 403 million, also a well designed and safe cycle network would be an asset. But, it it a good idea considering the present economic climate, and possibly as Iestyn ap Robert suggests, maybe a large portion of it is coming from EU funds, but I still maintain that it is not a good idea at present, this money could still be better spent elsewhere.

  5. Homegrown Hippie: Surprise myself by agreeing with you. If E.U. money can be splurged on ego-trips like the lumps of show-off architecture in Valencia (for just one example). Then a piffling few million on cycle tracks will be money well spent. There’s going to be a lot more people needing to get on their bikes in future. Road tax? Just how much wear and tear does a bike do to roads? Accidents? As in Holland ALWAYS the drivers fault, given the vulnerability of a cyclist. Two abreast? An accepted safety manoeuvre, giving cyclists the same profile as a car, ensuring drivers have a little patience until it is properly safe to pass. Things cyclists contribute are, clean air instead of exhaust fumes, thus doing their bit about climate change, they stay fitter relieving the strain on health services, and, though no price can be put on it, it’s a very enjoyable pastime and contributes to tourism when properly catered to.

  6. Very good news. It’s not just more recreational cycle routes that are desperately needed but safe routes in built-up areas. I know I would use my recumbant trike much more if I didn’t feel so imprisoned by the treacherous A7. Most of the urbanisations are simply not linked up properly even for cars let alone bicycles & pedestrians. We’ve all seen those brave cyclists along the A7 risking their lives because there’s often no other way of getting from A to B. And almost all the shopping centres make absolutely no provision for cyclists and pedestrians. The so-called planners who started all the developments only had cars in mind. But as a 69 year old retiree, I want to stay fit and healthy and to be able to cycle or walk to get some food without always jumping in the car and zooming to Mercadona or SuperSol just for a bunch of bananas. The less we all use our cars the better – less noise, pollution, stress etc you name i

  7. Very good news. It’s not just more recreational cycle routes that are desperately needed but safe routes in built-up areas. I know I would use my recumbant trike much more if I didn’t feel so imprisoned by the treacherous A7. Most of the urbanisations are simply not linked up properly even for cars let alone bicycles & pedestrians. We’ve all seen those brave cyclists along the A7 risking their lives because there’s often no other way of getting from A to B. And almost all the shopping centres make absolutely no provision for cyclists and pedestrians. The so-called planners who started all the developments only had cars in mind. But as a 69 year old retiree, I want to stay fit and healthy and to be able to cycle or walk to get some food without always jumping in the car and zooming to Mercadona or SuperSol just for a bunch of bananas. The less we all use our cars the better – less noise, pollution, stress etc you name it.

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