New Spanish poverty map reveals grim reality behind official stats

LAST UPDATED: 26 May, 2014 @ 12:18
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New Spanish poverty map reveals grim reality behind official stats

TOURIST destinations are the most poverty-stricken areas in Spain, according to a new map that completely rewrites the official figures.

Previously, the cost of living in different areas has been ignored when measuring poverty levels in Spain’s autonomous communities.

Taking this additional factor into account, the map turns the established view of Spain’s financial situation on its head, showing a much harsher financial situation.

Areas previously thought of as wealthy, such as the Costa del Sol, are shown to be among the poorest in Spain.

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Professor Elena Lasarte, from the Laboratory of Regional Economic Analysis at the University of Oviedo, said: “The rates of poverty are higher when we take into account the cost of living in each territory.

“Areas where rent is increasing and amenities are more expensive, such as popular tourist destinations, have a much higher incidence of poverty than normally estimated.

“In Barcelona, for example, a salary may be higher. But if you compare this with the significantly higher cost of living, the economic situation is the same that you might find in somewhere like Castilla la Mancha.”

Professor Lasarte added: “One of the most obvious lessons in this is that the way poverty is measured is hiding the reality. It’s a very relevant part of the problem.”

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7 COMMENTS

  1. Nothing really new here. Cost of living in London is, say, higher than say in Bradford or Newcastle.

    We also have poor regions in the U.K, that’s why so many are living on benefits and handouts the same as Spanish people are suffering.

    So due to this report suddenly people are thinking, “Hell, didn’t know poverty or poor regions existed anywhere”.

  2. “…completely rewrites the official figures.”

    That is pretty much Spain in a nutshell. They essentially fabricate every statistic possible to tell the world a different story to investors and tourists.

    OP: the article needs a link to a larger version of the map, so we can actually read it.

  3. @Fred,
    I don’t think the report painted a good picture on Spain’s poverty regions, but possibly good news for an investor, or someone wishes to purchase property here. (legal of course)

  4. Not surprised! In the coastal areas where tourism is the main source of income for most people, the increase of All Inclusive holidays means that a lot of people stay within the resort to “get their monies worth” rather than go out into the towns and surrounding areas and put their money into the local economy.

  5. “but possibly good news for an investor, or someone wishes to purchase property here”

    Caccia, I don’t think seeing an area becoming more and more poverty stricken enthuses one want to live in it.

  6. in Andalucia and the South you see the young people coming out of school/a lot want to stay in their local area near families
    But there are no jobs not even working in cafe and restaurants
    or building sites

  7. Something else that skews poverty and unemployment figures is the absolutely crazy Spanish “justice” system where unemployed youths who offend with minor crime…and the definition of “minor” is quite lax…and are unable to pay are simply deferred payment of the fine until employed…in many cases youths have ammassed hundreds of thousands of Euros in unpaid fines, which means they can NEVER find work,because they’d be working for no pay at all, given that the system would impound their entire salary.

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