Spain’s wealthy class on the rise

Spain’s upper class grew by 10% in 2014

LAST UPDATED: 29 Jun, 2015 @ 22:22
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THE number of rich people in Spain has increased by 40% since the beginning of the 2008 financial crisis.

eurosAccording to the annual World Rich Report published by RBC Wealth Management, 50,900 people have earned a higher patrimonial status since 2008.

The report revealed that Spain’s upper class grew by 10% in 2014, amounting to 178,000 people.



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12 COMMENTS

  1. Certainly the case that for some, things are rosy in the garden. Just look at how sales of Mercedes cars in Spain have risen over the last few years “http://www.statista.com/statistics/415146/mercedes-car-sales-in-spain/” But at least there are now 100k new jobs being created each month, and this will continue as the construction sector resumes growth. So some good news at least for the working population.

  2. “there are now 100k new jobs being created each month”

    There’s no hard evidence to show that such jobs are long-term. Seasonal variations alter these figures massively. The construction sector growth will once again be Spain’s biggest error if they don’t solve planning abuses first. So we have a new law for demolitions, but who is stopping illegal property being built to begin with? Anti-demolition could play well in the hands of unscrupulous developers. As for Mercedes, well they are so ubiquitous that they are not even considered a luxury brand by many people. Many new models are cheaper than Fords lol.

  3. It would be a very positive move if the EU imposed quality construction standards on all EU member States – of course this will never happen as the big construction companies would give the Eurocrats a good kicking and no more bungs.

  4. There is currently a downward trend in the unemployment levels, which is welcome, but 100K a month seems optimistic, but it depends on what you count as a “job”. Perhaps Squiddy can send us a link to the evidence of this?

  5. Stuart you surprise me. Bearing in mind that the UK is part of the EU I thought the building regulations in the UK were one of the most stringently controlled. Not only do they have to abide by the British Regulations Standards but also under the watchful eye of the council building inspectors at various stages of a build not forgetting the National House Building Council, but now I hear you saying that the construction companies in the UK maybe involved in bungs. Can quite understand that controls may be required in some of the other EU countries but the quality of building and control in the UK needs to be admired and followed. Not sure what the building controls are like in France.
    I could give an example of one of the stringent controls that I was involved with but afraid I would be accused of babbling by Stefanjo.

  6. jacko,
    along with the Spanish probably the most brainwashed people in Europe. Certain parts of Building Regs. part 2 are very good nowadays re. acoustic insulation but I suggest you talk to many that have bought recently built houses and found that within 2 years the floor joists were bowing – not surprised by this at all since the softwood used had’nt been seasoned for 5 years, extra cost around 20% and the dimensions woefully inadequate.

    I’ve been waiting to see the awful ugly housing estates around Crawley literally fall down. Design specs. suggest a lifespan of 50 years. No proper foundations, some literally built on mud. When I approached the site agent (completely unqualified unlike Germany where a degree is required) he said do you want to keep your job? As I already had my toolbag with me I said “are you really that thick, what do you think is in the toolbag”

    Old mining areas, Derbyshire for example, expensive houses built on top of old mines.As for the stupidity of still building with cavity walls – a cheapjack way of trying to increase the insulation value and because most bricks in the UK are very porous unlike the Netherlands where the bricks used are almost up to engineering brick standard. Aercrete blocks, first worked with these in 79, I would’nt consider using anything else to build a house with and are the best way to increase the U value of an existing house via dry lining, plasterboard should only be used for ceilings.You need to use your PC to check up on the Regs. in other countries.

    I have said this before a few years ago – you can now buy the German company xella’s aercrete products in Granada. Not only that but they will help you design an earthquake proof house as well, this may not be so in Spain but just get in touch with the parent company in Germany. Imagine living in a house that requires minimal heating in winter and no a/c in summer – just don’t get an idiot (otherwise known as an architect ) to design it for you. The only problem is that the School of Architects may well turn down your design, as it will make their designs look like the crap they are..

    The UK building regs are completely inferior to Germany/Scandinavia and the Arabs of the Magreb in Al Andalus could teach today’s building companies a thing or two about well designed and constructed housing. When an earthquake struck Granada in the 19th century a lot of centuries later Christian built Granada fell down but the Alhambra is still standing.

    As for a small percentage of Europe’s population getting richer yes quite true and they have used the time tested Roman ‘bread and circuses’ to keep the serfs in place. It is also an unspoken pact to get the serfs as fat as possible, much easier to control them that way. This game plan is totally successful as long as there is enough swill in the troughs aka ‘consumerism’ – the problem comes when there is’nt enough swill – then it’s game over

  7. Stuart, may I suggest you make contact the RIBA and give them your professional advice and idea’s of design and materials that should be used etc. It’s pointless making comments on OP which just falls on deaf ears. Builders in the UK can only build to the design’s by the architect’s and of materials available.
    Each country has various building reg’s depending on the type of weather conditions they have, i’e, cold or warm climate conditions, so it’s pointless in designing buildings with similar insulation’s required such as in Spain as those in the UK. One can find faults in all countries beside’s buildings but I’m afraid that’s life.

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