Costa del Sol holiday rental home rule breakers

LAST UPDATED: 22 Nov, 2016 @ 11:39
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THOUSANDS of holiday rental homes in Malaga have failed to be registered since the new regulations came into force.

MAKING WAVES: New centre will have pool and ski slope
MAKING WAVES: New centre will have pool and ski slope

Data released by the Junta de Andalucia has shown that of the 8,000 requests to register a property as ‘for tourist use’, 4,000 so far have met the requirements and been given their code number.

However a study by the Malaga Tourism Department before the law came into force in May estimated the number of holiday rentals advertised on the Costa del Sol to be 26,847, meaning thousands are choosing not to register.

Marbella has seen the most apartments and villas registered for tourist use, listing 693 homes with capacity for 4,229.

Torremolinos, however, which sees 40% of the coast’s tourist-related income, has registered just 197 homes with space for 866 people.



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10 COMMENTS

  1. Shouldn’t be too hard to find them. They would have to advertise them in some form or another or how would potential customers find them? Trip Advisor, HomeAway et al may be a good starting point perhaps?

    A holiday rental property with no renters is surely just a property?

  2. The authorities should fine the rental companies such as Owners Direct and Home and Away for advertising unlicensed property’s, as Jen mentioned to to rent a property you have to advertise it, this would be so easy for them to do and would stop it overnight . Get a licence if you want t advertise.

        • If it was that easy there would not be such a massive void of non-licensed properties. How can you get a license without complying with the rental rules? When something sounds to easy to be true, it often isn’t lol.

  3. Looks like the authorities are fining the rental company’s in Barcelona for advertising unlicensed rental property’s.
    It isn’t at all difficult to obtain a licence as long as your property is of a good standard, the only reason I can see people objecting to it is to avoid paying income tax on their rentals.

    • Not that easy Jean. It takes more than good standards to obtain a licence. A property can be refused because of where it is. Multi-occupied buildings can be especially difficult to licence because of potential noise and disturbance problems, even when many years of use can be proved.
      Valencia for instance, only allows ground floors to be licenced in the city.
      So it isn’t tax-dodging particularly, more a loss of income that some people rely on to help with a mortgage.

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