Flood advice: How to claim on insurance following Costa del Sol deluge

Many affected people are now looking to make an insurance claim

LAST UPDATED: 21 Dec, 2016 @ 13:25
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Homes under water on the Costa del Sol
Homes under water on the Costa del Sol

Following the widespread floods, many affected people are now looking to make an insurance claim.

When these types of disasters happen it is the El Conscorio de Compensación de Seguros (Consortium), a government body, that has to assess and payout on the losses.

Entitlement

To be entitled to a payout, you must have had a Spanish insurance policy in force for longer than seven days.

The reason for this is that a small amount of your premiums paid to your insurance company go to the consortium in order to cover you against natural disasters such as flooding.

The process

To register a claim, you must present your NIE number,  confirmation of the address affected and your Spanish bank account number including the IBAN number.

Once the claim is opened, one of the surveyors from the consortium will make contact and come along and look at the damages.

Upon their visit they will request to see a copy of your insurance policy, the receipt of payment and the terms and conditions of the policy.  

They will also want to see proof of your bank account number reflected against your name and a copy of your last IBI (financial tax) receipt.  

Property and personal belongings

Try to make an approximate indication of the monetary value of your claim prior to their arrival.

During their visit they will want to see the damaged items.

If this is not possible, as the items have had to be removed, they will request to see pictures of them instead.

If an urgent repair has had to be undertaken before their visit, keep the official  receipt of repair to give to the surveyor.

The Consortium will also cover expenses if your property is uninhabitable and loss of earnings if a business has been effected.

Vehicle damage

Surveyors will want to see the car in a garage.

They will request the name and address and telephone number of it and will go along to assess the damages.

When satisfied, they will either authorise the garage to repair the vehicle or they will make a payment according to the book value of the vehicle at the time of the loss.  

A copy of the car papers in the insured names will be requested along with a copy of your passport, and bank account details including the IBAN number.

If the car does get written off it is very important to make sure the baja (de-registering) of the vehicle is completed either with the traffic authorities or the scrap yard so you do not continue to get billed for the road taxes.

Final remarks

Claims can be made more than one week after a loss but it is advisable to register one straight away to make the process as quick as possible.

Should you not agree with the offer made by the consortium, you can employ a totally independent loss adjuster at your own expense.

The consortium can be contacted on Tlf 902 222 665 or going to www.consorseguros.es

 

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10 COMMENTS

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  1. Er just a minute, supposing you own a property just for holidays, then it becomes impossible to present an NIE number. Also, were’nt a a lot of genuine claims rejected for spurious reasons.

    I can see a lot of people posting with just this situation very quickly.

    • You cannot own a property in Spain without having an NIE number so this won’t be a problem for holiday home owners. We have only made an insurance claim a couple of times in Spain and it was quick and easy so I hope the flood victims have a similar experience.

  2. I had a flood at my home at Christmas some years ago and made a claim from Mapfre. They would not pay out claiming the rainfall was insufficient, yet Allianz paid out at similar properties nearby. So, it is luck of the draw.

  3. Stuart, I own a Spanish holiday flat, but I am not taxable as a permanent “resident” in Spain. Nevertheless I got a NIE from he local Dirección General de la Policia, after I bought my property. Without a NIE you are not able to do any administrative paper work in Spain.

    • Wolfgang. I suppose it’s logical if you own a Spanish holiday flat you would not be classed as a “resident” but you are still liable as a “non resident” for tax purposes. Beware.

  4. The reason I did’nt know is simple. No way would I ever have bought a Spanish built property and when one of Spain’s top interior designers told me that – no way would any school of architects ever pass one of my designs, we continued renting and was’nt that lucky. No trouble leaving when we chose to unlike so many that bought and can’t sell.

    • But Stuart, why is Spain any different to anywhere else outside of London etc,,,,, most houses in the UK are still worth less than 2008 prices, some by still 40%,,, thousands upon thousands of people are stuck in negative equity in the UK and throughout Europe…. When you lived here in your rented accommodation you done nothing but moan about Spain and the Spanish way of life…I could never understand why you were in Spain at all,,,,,. I hope you are as happy now as you were in sunny Espana and can find a local journal in which to entertain the natives,,,,,, Happy New Year to you and yours,,,,

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