30 May, 2024 @ 10:25
1 min read

Drought latest in Spain: Water supplies across Malaga province should last until at least October, say experts

March 5, 2024, Sant Miquel De Fluvia, Catalonia, Spain: The dry riverbed of the Fluvia river as it passes by Sant Miquel de Fluvia, in north Catalonia. The Fluvia is a river in Catalonia that rises in the Serralada Transversal and flows into the Mediterranean Sea. The drought that Catalonia has been suffering since 2021 has caused the flow rate and ecological quality of the rivers to decrease having this a negative impact on the biodiversity of the surrounding areas. (Credit Image: © Jordi Boixareu/ZUMA Press Wire)

WATER supplies across Malaga province should last until at least October, say experts as they give a fresh drought update. 

As summer begins to set in, Malaga will enter the hottest season of the year with 34 cubic hectometres of water less than this time last year.

Despite this, private and public pools have been given the green light to be filled on Saturday, June 1. 

READ MORE: Swimming pools across Spain’s Costa del Sol will FINALLY be filled this weekend

Drought measures continue to be enforced throughout Malaga.
Photo: Cordon Press

Other restrictions will remain in place across the region, including limited daily water and overnight cuts in some areas. 

Now, the Junta de Andalucia has confirmed drinking water supplies should last until at least the end of October. 

The seven reservoirs in the area are on average 27% full, accounting for 167 of a possible 611 hectometres. 

They are also losing around 1.6 cubic hectometres every week. 

According to Junta sources, this summer will mark a record low in the amount of drinkable water despite a historic number of tourists. 

They attribute the availability of drinkable water to restrictions that have been in place since the beginning of the year. 

Rainfall in March has also eased the situation, with reservoirs like la Concepcion reaching levels similar to this time last year. 

The reservoir is now at 74% capacity, at 42.7 cubic hectometres. 

Meanwhile la Viñuela, the biggest reservoir in the area, is at 19% capacity, leaving behind its ‘dead’ status declared before Easter. 

It now stands at 31.1 cubic hectometres, almost double its May 2023 levels. 

READ MORE: Malaga reservoirs hold less water than a year ago, latest figures show – as province prepares to fill 75,000 swimming pools

The Mancomunidad de Muncipios de la Costa del Sol Axarquia (Costa del Sol Axarquia Council’s Association) has confirmed their water supplies will allow them to see out the summer. 

Now the area’s reservoirs stand at: Guadalhorce (18%), Limonero (19%), Guadalteba (23%), Casasola (28,2%) and Conde de Guadalhorce (35%).

This week the Junta also approved new urgent measures to control the drought, stating it was still ‘serious’ and savings were needed.

Similar plans were approved a few weeks before by the Commission of Agriculture, Fish, Water and Rural Development. 

In December 2023, a Junta drought group approved urgent measures to combat the situation, including improving water distribution routes to prevent loss, as well as restricting water supply for agriculture and personal use. 

READ MORE: Villa owners face €6,000 fines for filling up private swimming pools

Yzabelle Bostyn

After spending much of her childhood in Andalucia and adulthood between Barcelona and Latin America, Yzabelle has settled in the Costa del Sol to put her NCTJ & Journalism Masters to good use. She is particularly interested in travel, vegan food and has been leading the Olive Press Nolotil campaign. Have a story? email [email protected]

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