393 bathers died from unintentional drowning in Spain last year according to the Royal Spanish Federation of Rescue and Lifeguards.

It’s a significant rise on 2021 figures which recorded less than 300 drownings in the lowest total since the Royal Federation started collating figures in 2015.

That was put down to fewer visitors due to Covid-19 travel restrictions.

A regional breakdown shows that popular holiday areas had the greatest number of incidents last year.

The highest number of deaths were in the Valencian Community with 67, followed by 63 in the Canary Islands, and 56 in Andalucia.

40 people died in Catalunya and there were 39 fatalities in both the Balearic Islands and Galicia.

Beaches saw the greatest number of drowning deaths with 217; rivers with 54; and swimming pools on 52.

Royal Federation spokesperson, Francisco Cano, said: “The figures show that unintentional drownings in aquatic areas are still a major public health and safety issue in Spain.”

Older bathers were the most vulnerable with 58 deaths in the 65 to 74 year age bracket, followed by 55 deaths among those aged 75 years and other.

The third highest category involved people aged 55 and 64 years, with 51 fatalities.

The most dangerous timeslot was noon to 2.00 pm which accounted for 60 deaths.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.