SPAIN woke up this morning to death and destruction as the Costa Blanca and parts of Andalucia were hit by a devastating storm that has paralyzed the regions.

Entire towns find themselves under curfew and at least three people have died in what has been described by authorities as some of the heaviest flooding on record.

DESTRUCTION: Scenes like this are repeated throughout Spain this morning.
PHOTO: Sky News

Tragically, a brother and sister, 51 and 61, died when their car overturned in floodwaters near Caudete, in Albacete.Meanwhile, a man died when he drowned in a flooded tunnel he had driven into in Almeria city

Spanish weather service AEMET said the entire coast and some inland provinces are at ‘extreme risk’ of even more downpours with the storm circulating the region throughout today and orange and yellow alerts in place until midnight. The so-called ‘gota fría’ – also known as a DANA – is the second to hit the region in two weeks, and also landed in the Balearic Islands, with flooding in Mallorca too.

As the Olive Press reported last night, citizens in Orihuela, Costa Blanca South, have been told by authorities to stay indoors while they deal with emergencies.

The river burst its banks in Ontinyent, flooding the Costa Blanca town and washing away hundreds of cars.

AEMET’s orange alert continues until this lunchtime, with a yellow alert continuing until midnight.

Schools and universities across the Murcia and Almeria regions have also been closed, with some hospitals cancelling all operations and treating emergencies only. Trains were cancelled today in the entire area.

150 people have been rescued by firemen and soldiers drafted in from the army from Puente Alto industrial estate in Orihiuela.

UNDER THREAT: Carlo III Bridge in Rojales could be in danger if waters rise further
PHOTO: Simon Wade

The Olive Press went to Rojales early this morning and witnessed local authorities desperately trying to prevent waters from rising any further against the ancient bridge that crosses the Rio Segura.

Equipment was in place to remove reeds and other detritus, reducing alluvial pressure on the 600-year-old bridge

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