UK HOLIDAY makers believe Spain will be off-limits as a summer travel destination by 2027, according to new research.

Following this summer’s wildfires and record-breaking temperatures across the UK and Europe specialist travel insurance providers InsureandGo asked 2,089 people last month to estimate which European countries could be too hot to travel to by 2027. 

Spain was the top destination holiday makers were most worried about, with 65% of respondents believing the climate in the southern European hotspot would be unbearable in five years. 

About 53% of people aged between 18-34 said Spain would be too hot to travel to, while 83% of over 65s said the same. 

Spain Heatwave Wildfires
Wildifres have ravaged parts of Spain this year as the country sweltered through a brutal summer.

It comes after Spain this year sweltered through the most torrid summer since 1961.

The country’s average temperature for June, July and August was 24 degrees celsius, 2.2 degrees more than the usual average.

InsureandGo chief executive Chris Rolland said the results from the study were “staggering”. 

“UK holiday makers are really paying attention to what is going on in the world in terms of global warming,” he said.

“The family summer holiday will certainly not go away. Our research does suggest however, that it may well change in terms of holiday makers moving toward cooler climates – or perhaps that Easter and Christmas will become the school holidays when more families head abroad for their break. 

“I think this research is a real eye opener that things need to change – and fast.”

The Vega Baja region in Spain saw thermometers hit a scorching 46.2 degrees in the San Bartoleme area of Orihuela City.

There are only 11 instances of temperatures recorded in Spain that have been hotter.

It was the highest since official records started in Vega Baja in 1927, beating the previous high of 45.7 degrees recorded in Orihuela City on July 4, 1994. 

Britain recorded its highest ever temperature in July as the 40C mark was provisionally broken for the first time, at Heathrow airport. 

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