Smoking linked to weight gain

LAST UPDATED: 20 Mar, 2012 @ 22:59
4
SHARE
Smoking linked to weight gain

THE mystery surrounding why smokers put on weight after quitting the habit may have been solved by Spanish researchers.

The discovery of a link between nicotine and the enzyme responsible for controlling appetite and energy consumption could now be used to help combat obesity.

Scientists at Santiago de Compostela University found that nicotine suppresses the enzyme, which may explain why 70 per cent of smokers put on weight after quitting.

Elsewhere, a study has found that the number of smokers in Spain has increased in the last five years, despite the introduction of tougher anti-smoking laws last year.

The number of smokers has risen to 17.6 per cent, a growth of 0.5 per cent compared to 2007, according to the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery.

4 COMMENTS

The Olive Press are not responsible and do not moderate individual comments before they are posted. Anyone who uses racist, sexist, homophobic or xenophobic language or hate speech will be blocked.
  1. Hey chris, good news you should keep smoking in order not to grow fat and see you are not alone out there.

    You smoking guys can meet up at the friendly neighborhood Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery Center to catch up on “Who is still around”

  2. You do realize that there are other methods of obtaining nicotine that do not involve smoking right? Patches, gum, E-cigs, even food. Nicotine (in reasonable amounts) is no more dangerous than caffeine. Studies are even showing that nicotine is beneficial to people who suffer from depression, and may even help those with Alzheimer’s and dementia.

  3. Thank you so much for your contribution Ms. R.A.R., and if I may, I would like to add that castor oil is reasonably good for digestive problems, I sincerely hope you know that ? and that it is now available in doughnut form. Studies have shown that castor oil is highly beneficial to people with constipation and may even help those with reading disorders, a secondary effect due to prolonged time on the porcelain.

HAVE YOUR SAY...