A CONVICTED British conman has been accused of striking again in a car transport scam running up and down the Costa Blanca.

Simon Davies
CONMAN: Simon Davies

Simon Davies, 58, who now runs Mission Impossible Transport from Almeria, was jailed in 2008 for his part in a €450,000 mortgage fraud.

But the trickster – who goes by various aliases – has allegedly struck again after being denounced to the Guardia Civil, in Alicante, for stealing a top-of-the-range car from a British expat.

According to Kenny Greenhow, who lives in Lo Crispin, near Ciudad Quesada, Davies has nicked his BMW convertible, worth €8,000, en route to the UK.

The coatings inspector, from South Shields, told the Olive Press he had paid £820 (€970) to get his beloved 120i back to the UK in December.

He has not seen it since.

“It’s important that police catch up with the guy, and stop other people being conned the way that I have,” said Greenhow, 61, who has also reported the theft to the UK police.

“As long as justice is done and he is behind bars.”

Kenny Greenhow Crop
VICTIM: Kenny Greenhow

Greenhow had first come across Mission Impossible Ltd, via an online broker uShip.

The company’s profile, which is still on the website, claims to have five vehicles and drivers and has £50,000 goods in transit insurance and £2 million public liability insurance.

“I got plenty of quotes, and Davies was the cheapest,” he explained. “With the query going through a broker, I thought he’d be legitimate.

“But when the car didn’t arrive after its delivery date in the UK, I started digging around and to my horror discovered his reputation and past.”

These included damning reviews on sites such as uShip.com calling Davies ‘a complete scammer’ and ‘a liar’. 

Other reviews about a previous company, SD Sameday Couriers, on yell.com gave him one star and claimed he had ‘disappeared’ goods and failed to respond to customer queries.

Kenny Bmw
MISSING: The BMW 120i Convertible allegedly left with police in northern Spain

Our research reveals that Davies is no stranger to fraud.

SD Sameday recently shared an address with Cleanrite Ltd and Sparklebrite Ltd in Essex, companies run by his wife, Anita.

Their marriage certificate, available online, shows Simon Clive Davies to have previously been known as ‘Clive Emmanuel Smith’, who was jailed for fraud in 2008.

The Lancashire Telegraph reported that Davies (then 46), aka Clive Emmanuel Smith, had been handed three years and six months for his part in a £380,000 mortgage fraud.

Shockingly, Davies has other convictions, including when he persuaded an investor to hand over £30,000 to start a new mobile phone business called Callfree.net Ltd, in 2005.

Sd 1
MULTIPLE NAMES: Davies has used a number of aliases

What he hadn’t revealed was his banning as a director from 2004 to 2010 after a previous company had gone into liquidation with debts of nearly £200,000. 

A few years later, a bankruptcy order was made against him in the name of ‘Clive Smith’, which again disqualified him from acting as a company director.

Despite this, he went on to act as director of property company, Safe as Houses Ltd, under a different identity.

“We are determined to crack down on cheats like these who profit by deception,” said Pat McFadden, of the UK’s Department for Business.

When contacted this week, Davies claimed the BMW had simply been left with police in ‘northern Spain’ due to ‘problems with paperwork’.

Davies said he was ‘sick of being stopped by Spanish police’, saying the car had become a ‘hot potato’ over problems with bureaucracy. 

He failed, however, to name the police station nor region of northern Spain where he left the car.

Davies added he had been in touch with the UK police over the issue.

Mission Impossible Transport’s broker, uShip, confirmed to the Olive Press that Davies’ account is currently suspended.

The company was set up out of an office in Old Street, London, in 2018, and despite a threat of being struck off last year, is still apparently trading.

If you know Davies in any of his guises contact the Olive Press at +34 951 273 575 or email newsdesk@theolivepress.es

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.