21 Dec, 2020 @ 15:45
1 min read

Spain’s Mallorca increases penalties in Level 4, with bars and restaurants now facing €600,000 fines

Palma de Mallorca

THE Government of the Balearic Islands has announced that it will increase penalties on businesses in Mallorca that fail to adhere to the Level 4 coronavirus restrictions.

President Francina Armengol said that establishments that fail to follow the new rules could now receive a fine up to €600,000.

This penalty was previously set at a maximum of €60,000.

They may also be forced to close for a set period of time.

Armengol said: “During Level 4, any infraction will be considered very serious and the consequence will therefore be matched.”

Level 4 is deemed the most serious in the Balearic COVID-19 tier system and includes the harshest restrictions.

These include a 10pm curfew and a ban on the use of the interior areas of bars and restaurants which also must close by 6pm on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.

Meanwhile, the Balearic government has stated their intentions to extend the Level 4 restrictions in Mallorca until January 11.

Armengol had said previously that the epidemiological situation would be assessed on December 28 and that the island could return to Level 3.

Balearic Health Minister Patricia Gomez has also asked residents to avoid travelling to mainland Spain over the festive period unless for a justified cause.

In anticipation of an increase in infections at Christmas, the government has hired 377 people to be ‘COVID-19 mediators’.

These new employees will be be tasked to speak to the general public about the restrictions and how they can protect themselves from the virus from Wednesday.

Aremengol said: “They will be out on the streets and their work will be explanatory, meaning that they will inform citizens on the best practices to follow to fight coronavirus.”

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