TRADITIONAL San Juan festivities on all Costa Blanca beaches have been suspended for the second year, thanks to the Coronavirus pandemic.

The municipalities of Alicante and El Campello have banned access to the coast from 9pm on Wednesday, June 23.

San Juan Fire
BANNED: At least until next year

Alicante Policia Local will deploy 332 local police officers along with 20 volunteers from the Civil Protection group.

Two drones will also monitor people accessing beaches in the busiest resorts.

Police are also preparing for “strong vigilance” to prevent alcohol consumption, together with a reinforcement of night service operations, quads and volunteers.

The Mayor of Alicante stated, “We are going to be prudent; we are with very low infection rates and we must continue thus avoiding any situation that may lead to crowds because health is always a priority.”

Torrevieja City Council has also appealed to citizens not to go to local beaches throughout the celebrations.

Councilor for Security and Emergencies, Federico Alarcón, assured, “Units will ensure safety, expecting the same exemplary behavior as witnessed in 2020.”

About ‘San Juan’

“Saint John’s Eve”, starting at sunset on 23 June, is the eve of celebration before the Feast Day of Saint John the Baptist.

The Gospel of Luke states that John was born six months before Jesus; therefore, the feast of John the Baptist was fixed on 24 June.

This feast day is one of the very few saints’ days which commemorates the anniversary of the birth, rather than the death, of the saint being honoured.

The Feast of Saint John closely coincides with the June solstice, also known as midsummer.

This tradition of leaping over fire is especially strong in north-western areas of Spain like Galicia, where firework displays accompany the events.

On the Mediterranean coast, especially in Catalonia and Valencia, special foods such as Coca de Sant Joan, are also served up.

In Alicante, Bonfires of Saint John are considered the most important festival, and normally take place over a few days.

In Castile and León it is highlighted the Fire-walking Festival of San Pedro Manrique, where barefoot men cross the live coals of a prepared bonfire.

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