AS Mallorca takes its first tentative steps into Phase 1 of Spain’s de-escalation plan, local business owners have been warned of the serious repercussions faced should the COVID-19 safety measures be ignored at terraces.

Crowds of people, tables seated less than two meters apart and a failure by staff to wear masks were just some of the issues brought to light on the first two days of the island entering Phase 1.

According to the Association of Bars, Restaurants and Cafes (CAEB), multiple establishments across Mallorca failed to implement the strict hygiene protocols and will now face a denuncia.

This in itself could lead to a hefty fine and an appearance in court.

The association says several restaurants and bars in the centre of Palma, Santa Catalina and El Molinar acted with ‘ignorance’ by breaching the 50% capacity rule.

Palma de Mallorca
POPULAR: Terraces have been the star attraction in Phase 1 ©theOlivePress

Warning of the ‘serious repercussions,’ CAEB appealed for business owners to comply with the regulations laid down by the central government as ‘if a few fail to comply, they will harm everyone.’

“Not only can we put everyone’s health at risk, but we will also seriously damage businesses that have already reopened in the sector,” the group said.

To ensure normality can be achieved without posing a risk to health they insist that social distance should be a basic requirement and that crowds of people should be avoided at all times.

For this reason, CAEB have published an informative guide on the safety protocols that must be applied.

What standards must establishments meet?

Terraces are to be opened at 50% capacity, with a maximum occupancy of 10 people per table and maintaining a distance of two metres between tables.

Palma de Mallorca
EXEMPLARY: A terrace in the capital respecting the COVID-19 protocols ©theOlivePress

Regarding hygienic measures, all establishments must carry out the following:

  • Regular cleaning and disinfection of terrace furniture, including tables, chairs and any other surfaces that clients touch
  • The use of single-use tablecloths and in the event that this is not possible, they must be used once and washed on a 60 or 90 degrees centigrade cycle
  • Hand sanitisers authorised by the Ministry of Health must be made available to the public and be placed at the entrance of an establishment with clear instructions for use
  • Table menus should be replaced with blackboards, posters or electronic menus made available to clients online
  • Crockery, glasses, cutlery and tablecloths must be stored away from from areas where customers and employees pass
  • One person allowed in a restroom at a time, except for those who require assistance
  • Toilets must be cleaned and disinfected at least six times a day
  • Self-service products that are usually shared, such as napkin rings, toothpicks and cruets, are prohibited

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Photography by Allan Binderup

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